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Paris’ or Paris’s?

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By admin on February 12, 2024.

Paris’ is a possessive form of Paris, which you should use when following the rules of the AP Stylebook. E.g., “Paris’ architecture is renowned.” Also, Paris’s is a singular possessive form, which you should use for the Chicago Manual of Style. E.g., “Paris’s cultural heritage is diverse.”

As the following chart shows, there is no plural or plural possessive form because there is only one Paris, and it is a proper noun.

FormExample
SingularParis
PluralNA
Singular possessivesParis’ / Paris’s
Plural possessiveNA

Here are some examples that illustrate the different forms of Paris.

  • Singular: The Eiffel Tower is located in Paris.
  • Singular possessive: Paris’ fashion scene is internationally acclaimed.
  • Singular possessive: Paris’s museums showcase rich artistic history.

As you can see, there are two forms of the singular possessive. One with just an apostrophe at the end of Paris, and the other with an apostrophe and “s.”

In academic writing, you should use Paris’ if your text needs to be in AP Style. However, you should use Paris’s if you are following the Chicago Manual of Style.

Now we have covered the basics of using the possessive forms of the word Paris. Keep reading the rest of the page to learn more about using them in your writing.

Paris’

The word Paris’ is the singular possessive form of the city of Paris. Therefore, you use it when you want to refer to things that belong to or come from Paris.

These things could include cultural aspects.

  • Paris’ culinary traditions are world-renowned.

Furthermore, you can use it to refer to people that come from Paris.

  • Paris’ representative at the summit emphasized the importance of art.

You can choose which version of the possessive you want to use in everyday writing. However, Paris’ is the version that the AP Stylebook recommends.

Furthermore, in British English, Paris’ is still more popular than Paris’s. In addition, Paris’ was more prevalent in American English until 2010, when Paris’s became the more common possessive form.

Paris’s

The term Paris’s is a singular possessive form of Paris. Therefore, you can use it when you want to say something or someone belongs to or comes from Paris.

  • Paris’s role in history is significant.

In addition, you should use Paris’s as the singular possessive if you are writing following the rules of the Chicago Manual of Style.

Paris’s is currently the more common possessive form in the US, but it has only been that way since around 2010. Prior to that, Paris’ was the more common possessive form.

In addition, people often use the version Paris’ when the following word starts with an “s.” However, if you do this, make sure to be consistent and do it throughout your writing.

  • Paris’ streets are bustling with activity.

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